Mack Elevation Forum | RSS Feed http://mackelevationforum.com CPG Sales Strategy & Consulting Mon, 25 May 2015 13:34:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Are Millennials Allergic to You? http://mackelevationforum.com/are-millennials-allergic-to-you/ http://mackelevationforum.com/are-millennials-allergic-to-you/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 02:24:28 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1447 The Idea: Advertising campaigns can make or break a brand, but if there is one thing that is sure to frustrate millennials it is an inauthentic advertising campaign. Millennials often call marketing campaigns “patronizing”, “condescending” and “tone-deaf.” Do you know how you are perceived?

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The Idea:  Advertising campaigns can make or break a brand, but if there is one thing that is sure to frustrate millennials it is an inauthentic advertising campaign. Millennials often call marketing campaigns “patronizing”, “condescending” and “tone-deaf.” Do you know how you are perceived?


Not only do millennials know better than any other generation when an advertising campaign is inauthentic, but also they are allergic to it.  They actively distance themselves from the products.

Darren Ross, an Executive for Fluent, an Ad Tech agency, writes:

“By the time most brands jump on a popular culture trend in an effort to be funny, these young adults have moved on and brands look foolish for trying.”

Advertising campaigns can make or break a brand, but if there is one thing that is sure to frustrate millennials it is an inauthentic advertising campaign.  Millennials often call marketing campaigns “patronizing”, “condescending” and “tone-deaf.”

How are you perceived?

As my 21 year old son shared with me, “I love companies that take the time to personally get to know me, respect me, understand me and avoid invading me with ineffective and intrusive advertising.”

Ross goes on:

“It’s painfully clear to this audience when a brand hasn’t made an effort to know them, and there is little tolerance for the brand that gets the tone, message and approach wrong.”

We all know the feeling of trying to fit in, and we’ve all watched someone work hard to impress, yet fail to connect.  In those moments, it is very easy to tell when someone is not trustworthy, honest nor genuine.  They are working too hard to gain others approval.

If you are having one-way dialogue, overselling or inauthentic with your millennial consumers, you are trying too hard.

To read more about how to avoid bad marketing techniques, check out Ross’s Wired article here.

 

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Why Do Smart Leaders Fail? http://mackelevationforum.com/why-do-smart-leaders-fail/ http://mackelevationforum.com/why-do-smart-leaders-fail/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 02:15:20 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1443 The Idea: Smart leaders who end up failing often times are guilty of four sins. They get off track with their decisiveness, fail to create systems hindering execution, struggle with financial accountability and/or fail to attract and retain talent (especially younger talent). Who in your life is giving you on-going feedback?

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The Idea:  Smart leaders who end up failing often times are guilty of four sins. They get off track with their decisiveness, fail to create systems hindering execution, struggle with financial accountability and/or fail to attract and retain talent (especially younger talent). Who in your life is giving you on-going feedback?


Smart leaders who end up failing often times get off track with their decisiveness, they fail to create systems hindering execution, struggle with financial accountability and/or fail to attract and retain talent (especially younger talent).  I have also been personally inspired that the best leaders actually create virtual board of advisors to help them stay in reality.  They are not afraid of on-going feedback and critique.

Most of us (as leaders) need to spend less time trying to motivate our teams, and more time ensuring we are not de-motivating our organizations.  What do I mean by that?  According to Florida State researcher Wane Hochwarter there are five themes that are getting in the way of team motivation. They are deadly, but can be fixed.

  • 39% said their leaders fail to keep promises
  • 37% said their leaders failed to give them credit
  • 27% said their leaders made negative comments to others about them.
  • 24% said their leaders had invaded their privacy.
  • 23% said their leaders had blamed others for their mistakes.

So why do smart leaders fail?  According to researcher Roger Bellows who conducted a study titled – Employee Motivation: The Role of the Supervisor– there are a number of key drivers including:

  • Inability to Get Along with Others
  • Failure to Adapt One’s Style
  • The “Me Only”  Syndrome (Alienating Others)
  • Fear of Action
  • Inability to Rebound
  • Executive is too defined by the job
  • Not taking seriously the strengths of key competitors

These are serious conditions, how did you fair?

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Who is Your Young Guru? http://mackelevationforum.com/who-is-your-young-guru/ http://mackelevationforum.com/who-is-your-young-guru/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 01:39:04 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1440 The Idea: Who do you go to for fresh thinking and leadership inspiration? All organizations can learn about the creative process from the hyper-competitive entertainment industry. They are not afraid of bringing in outsiders. Are you willing to be shifted? What one new person should be brought into your team?

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The Idea:  Who do you go to for fresh thinking and leadership inspiration? All organizations can learn about the creative process from the hyper-competitive entertainment industry. They are not afraid of bringing in outsiders. Are you willing to be shifted? What one new person should be brought into your team?


Steve Jobs had Jony Ive, Apple’s SVP of Design – the creative mind behind the majority of the beautiful Apple designs that decorate our homes and offices.  U2’s Bono was silently and subtly inspired by the words of producer Daniel Lanois and engineer Mark Ellis better known as “Flood” in the creation of many of their early albums.

Who do you go to for inspiration?

A Wall Street Journal article recently exposed me to Young Guru, the music industry’s “most important sound engineer,” who has worked with acts including Eminem, Jay-Z and Beyonce on some of their most distinguished work.  Young Guru is known for his broad understanding of sounds and precision in building the songs that we know today.  He is Jay-Z’s personal sound engineer, and has been praised by some of the most famous artists around. “He truly is a scientist, a musician, a visionary,” says Grammy award-winning artist Common.

How could Young Guru receive such high praise when he isn’t the one with the guitar or the one with the voice?  As I dug deeper, I realized that the emotional responses we have to our favorite songs are because of the tiny details that engineers like Young Guru are creating.  To the untrained ear, they are unidentifiable.  But the effects on the listener are HUGE.

Journalist Neal Pollack explains this influence terrifically:

“While artists and producers tend to think about the creation of a song on a macro level, engineers operate on a micro scale, using precise metrics to smooth out or blow up any sonic detail within the overall sweep of a song, much as a baker deploys exact pinches of spices and ingredients to achieve a desired taste.

Often, the things we never see have the most important effect on our results. Young Guru will likely never be a household name like Jay-Z is.  Similarly, most people will never appreciate the role of a sound engineer in the music they love.  I didn’t.  But Young Guru’s work has quietly revolutionized music in pop culture and the key influencers in the music industry know it

  • Who can be brought onto your team to positively disrupt your creativity?
  • What trusted advisors can anticipate your team’s future needs and challenges?
  • Who do you sit down with that actually transforms the atmosphere and your thinking?

What one person should be brought into your creation process and your leadership team?  Who is your Young Guru?

To find out more about Young Guru and his background, check out the Wall Street Journal article here.

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Strategic Alignment And The Art Of Co-creation http://mackelevationforum.com/strategic-alignment-and-the-art-of-co-creation-2/ http://mackelevationforum.com/strategic-alignment-and-the-art-of-co-creation-2/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 19:07:44 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1180 The post Strategic Alignment And The Art Of Co-creation appeared first on Mack Elevation Forum.

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By Antoinette Alexander, Drugstore News

The best partnerships involve transparent storytelling and the freedom to have risky conversations. Call it “co-creation.” It is the way leading retailers and CPG companies are working together today to identify and leverage the unique hidden assets of their brands, and build a business plan around agile and transparent collaboration.

To take marketing professionals on a journey of the co-creation process, what it means and why it’s critical to joint business planning, industry leaders Shannon Curtin, GMM and VP of beauty, personal care and seasonal at Walgreens, and Dan Mack, founder and managing director of strategic sales and consulting firm Mack Elevation Forum, co-hosted, “Elevating Customer Engagement through Co-Creation,” a key part of the educational lineup, here Wednesday, at the annual Shopper Marketing Expo.

Why co-creation? Because it enables marketers to answer a critical question and face the biggest threat to future growth. “If your brand was delisted today,” Curtin posited, “would anyone care? Would your customer care? Co-creation creates care, and care creates long-term revenue potential. Without care, brands do not survive.”

What is it and what does it look like? Co-creation is a total process that starts with something the pair described as “relevant innovation” — identifying something that is missing from the marketplace — and then creating a solution to satisfy it.

“Co-creation is not just about shopper marketing, and it is certainly not about just creating new products. It is about everything,” Mack explained. “Co-creation is about ideas. It is about assets.”

“Co-creation is not a technique; it really is a philosophy and it is part of your identity as a company if you do it well,” he added.

And at the heart of the process is an honesty that leaves the retailer and the brand free to author the customer experience together. An open mind is critical, but just as critical is the ability to come up with fresh ideas and bring new, emerging insights to the table that help unlock value for the customer. “The best partnerships include transparent storytelling where both parties are invited to participate. It is about storytelling and asking someone to come into your story,” said Mack. “When a retailer and a manufacturer do that well they create solutions together for the consumer.”

In order to win with co-creation, manufacturers must work to overcome the blind spots that can hinder strategic alignment with retailers, compromising the effectiveness of those engagements and hampering brand growth. Mack categorized the blind spots into three buckets:

  • Overestimating yourself and your assets;
  • Underestimating the competition; and
  • A lack of transparency and effective communication.

“Those three things are big, … but the key is how do you be relevant, how do you be valuable and drive change and be a transformational organization?” Mack said.

Being transformative is another critical element of successful co-creation. Unlike change, Curtin explained, transformation is intentional; it is a choice to do something different. “The intentional choices that you make will move you from that really good company that you are today to the really great one that you aspire to be,” Curtin said.

Co-creation with its vendor partners is an important growth factor for Walgreens, said Curtin,

ple of how the retailer partnered with one small brand to help unilaterally grow the business. That brand, “Yes To,” is no longer a small brand by any stretch of the imagination.

More than six years ago, Yes To brands founder Ido Leffler met with Walgreens with a mission: To sell his line of skin and hair care products in Walgreens. Intrigued by the unique offering and Leffler’s passion, Walgreens agreed to become the brand’s first retail partner and worked with Leffler exclusively for nearly a year to help build the brand and grow the business.

Today, the brand “is in more than 20 countries and is the second-largest natural brand in this space, and he has done that in less than 10 years,” she added.

At the end of day, what’s important to remember is that, while there may be a basic blueprint for co-creation, it is important for brands to let their identify shine through in their engagements with retailers, Mack admonished. “It is a combination of blending both strategy and art — finding that radical middle between the right and left brain,” he said.

For more news from the Shopper Marketing Expo, visit DrugStoreNews.com/shopper- marketing-expo.

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Sansone, Leonardi Headline Elevation Forum http://mackelevationforum.com/sansone-leonardi-headline-elevation-forum/ http://mackelevationforum.com/sansone-leonardi-headline-elevation-forum/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:48:36 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1175 The post Sansone, Leonardi Headline Elevation Forum appeared first on Mack Elevation Forum.

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By Rob Eder, Drugstore News

How is it that some companies seem to thrive in an environment of uncertainty — even chaos — while most others fail? Understanding how the winners are able to embrace the paradox of control and the uncontrollable, and how two leading retail organizations are doing it every day across thousands of stores, was the key focus of the most recent Mack Elevation Forum meeting, held April 20 in Palm Beach, Fla.
Moderated by Elevation Forum creator Dan Mack and presented by The Swanson Group, forum members — which included sales and marketing executives from nearly 20 leading consumer health and consumer packaged goods companies of various sizes — discussed opportunities for value creation with major retailers, mining a brand’s hidden assets and what it is that makes some companies successful amid chaos and uncertainty.
But the real stars of the day were retailers Judy Sansone, SVP merchandising and store pricing for CVS Caremark, and Joanne Leonardi, director of HBC for Ahold USA, who came to talk face-to-face with Elevation Forum attendees about how their companies could better engage with their chains.
Sansone talked about CVS’ vision for creating personalization for its customers and in the communities it serves, and further leveraging its industry-leading ExtraCare loyalty card program. ExtraCare, now in its 14th year, has 69 million active cardholders. Card members are accounting for about 82% of all front-end sales and 67% of all store transactions.
Key to CVS’ segmentation strategy is a store clustering initiative that seeks to better mold its stores to the unique needs of the communities it serves. CVS will look to build each store’s assortment based on the key reasons consumers shop there, Sansone explained. For instance, CVS has identified about 400 of its stores that deserve a permanent end display of adult incontinence items to meet everyday demand; however, baby products do not perform well in these stores and would be de-emphasized, she described.
An early example of CVS’ clustering strategy has been CVS’ Urban Cluster stores, which fea26 • JUNE 25, 2012
UpFRONT
ture a vastly expanded consumables offering. A new variation will include a greater emphasis on fresh food, and other store clusters are being designed to serve Hispanic neighborhoods, as well as others for top beauty and pharmacy areas.
As CVS continues down this path of greater personalization, it is an area where it will expect continued help from its suppliers. As many as 30% of CVS’ promotional offers are currently personalized, and it is looking for greater conversion among its ExtraCare users — another area that it is looking to its suppliers for help with — with an eye toward capturing a greater share of the consumers’ wallet.
For her part, Leonardi challenged Elevation Forum members to think of Ahold and its four unique operating divisions — Stop & Shop New York, Stop & Shop New England, Giant Landover and Giant Carlisle — essentially as drug stores, and for vendors to offer its stores the same opportunities they would offer to customers in the drug channel and to play off Ahold’s inherent strengths. For instance, Ahold typically is cheaper in health and beauty aids versus the drug channel, and the chain is looking to its vendors to help drive programs and create products that help it earn credit with consumers on pricing.
Important to Ahold, Leonardi explained, is that its vendors create unique products and programs that optimize cross-channel shopping, and that leverage the authenticity of each of its divisions and help them look different from their core competitors. Local adaptation is the key to helping Ahold win in its markets, and vendors need to think in terms of how they customize their products and programs to match each of the formats it operates.
One program Leonardi challenged vendors to take a greater role in is Ahold’s First Rack program for HBC items, and to look to create opportunities in health and wellness to drive customers to their brands and to Ahold’s stores.
Private-label growth remains a priority at Ahold, with a long-term goal of 40% penetration by 2016 — last year private label accounted for about 31% of sales — the continued expansion of its Care One health and beauty brand is a great contributor to reaching this goal. The line currently includes more than 800 healthcare SKUs and more than 300 personal/beauty care SKUs.
Attending April’s Elevation Forum were Tom Rice of Ansell, Jim McGuiness of Drive Medical, Bruce Montgomery of Fleet Labs, Tim Cleary of GoJo Industries, Jeff Burress of Beiersdorf, Nilda Oyola of Majestic Drug, Ward Lennon of Abbott Medical Optics, Jim Doyle of Sunstar Americas, Bob Ford of Coty, John Kotkosky of Celsius, Mike Huard of i-Heath/DSM, John Kelly of Nature’s Products, Dan Quail and Urs Lehmann of Similasan, John Bennett of Pacific World, Jim Beghtol of Lil Drug Store, Darrick Blinoff of Traditional Medicinals, Charles Wachsberg of Apollo Health and Beauty Care, Rich Swanson of The Swanson Group and Wayne Bennett of Drug Store News.
The next Elevation Forum was scheduled for June 22 in Denver. Walmart’s Carmen Bauza was the special guest retailer speaker.

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Leaders Should Seek Advisers http://mackelevationforum.com/leaders-should-seek-advisers/ http://mackelevationforum.com/leaders-should-seek-advisers/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:36:51 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1159 The post Leaders Should Seek Advisers appeared first on Mack Elevation Forum.

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Dan Mack, Drugstore News

“Why do smart leaders fail? They go off track with lack of strategic decisiveness, failure to create systems driving execution, struggle with financial management or talent retention. The top leaders create a virtual board of advisers to help them stay in reality.” That was one of the key messages conveyed by Elevation Forum founder Dan Mack to more than 30 senior leaders during the Health & Wellness @Retail 2013 event in San Antonio.

On May 30, this group of senior executives — as well as keynote speaker and H-E-B’s group VP drug store, beauty, general merchandise, floral and services Bill Anderson — gathered as part of the latest Elevation Forum. Anderson shared with the team how to align their business philosophy with H-E-B.

TABS Group partner David Butcher also brought forward a trade optimization model for dramatically improving trade investments. According to Butcher, “Everyone can get more out of their promotions, if they
stay out of the weeds and concentrate on where the post-evaluation data takes you.”

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Vegas Forum http://mackelevationforum.com/vegas-forum/ http://mackelevationforum.com/vegas-forum/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:31:26 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1152 The post Vegas Forum appeared first on Mack Elevation Forum.

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By Antoinette Alexander, Drugstore News

Experts discuss game-changing strategies perspectives

Continued from page 8 businesses, even the most successful, run into challenges sustaining and achieving growth. Faced with this unpleasant reality, they are compelled to reinvent themselves,” Martindale told attendees. “The ability to pull off this difficult feat and jumping from the maturity stage of one business model to the growth stage of the next is really what separates high performers from those who spend too short of time at the top.” Turning conventional wisdom on its head and embracing change is critical. Martindale discussed how Rite Aid set about creating a new vision, mission and core values, as well as uncovering its “hidden assets.”
• Dennis Moore of Nielsen talked about “big data, smart data.” Moore said that, when he thinks about data and analytics, he judges it by the way it leads to an action. “I always tell the analytic teams at Nielsen that the value in what we do is in the action that it influences,” Moore said. Moore acknowledged that a challenge is that data can be subject to partisanship and there’s often a rush to define it, but he also said that big data can help companies in such areas as identifying untapped opportunities and attracting new buyers. He said that in order to use big data effectively it boils down to leadership. “If you really believe in this, you have to change your internal systems. How do you make decisions? How do you decide how you are going to promote? How you are going to assort? How you are going to market, and is it infused with analytics? And that is everyone’s job [within the company],” Moore said.
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• Larry Levin of IRI addressed how to win through store localization. “Everybody is going to as many channels as they can to maximize value,” Levin said. In light of this, the dollar store channel is experiencing significant growth — especially among those making more than $100,000 and those under age 35 years — and drug stores are viewed as the new convenience. Levin stressed the importance of understanding the shopper and, for suppliers, understanding that you don’t have to be in every store with your product. In other words, cherry-pick those stores that make the most sense for your product. “Not all neighborhoods and not all stores within a strip mall are created equal. They share a common footprint, but the kinds of people that walk in can be very different, so dare to be different,” Levin told attendees.
• Walgreens’ Shannon Curtin talked about co-creation, innovation and how to drive value. When talking about co-creation, Curtin stressed the importance of opening up the dialogue between both the retailer and supplier to ensure you are on the same road at the same time. “Being the best at co-creation is having this wonderful creative genius, and that starts with transparency and having these conversations,” Curtin said. Curtin discussed why it is important for suppliers to co-create with Walgreens and how the retailer has helped smaller manufacturers successfully enter the market. “The value of working together is bigger than the value of working alone,” Curtin said. One example of co-creation that Curtin used was the partnership between Walgreens and DSN to create Beauty University, a training platform for Walgreens’ 26,000-plus beauty advisers.
• Mark Jones of IDEO talked about innovation and creativity. Jones encouraged attendees to observe insights, brainstorm (i.e., the more ideas the better) and make the ideas real (i.e., sketch it, build it and act it out). During his presentation, Jones also gave attendees a behindthe-scenes look at how IDEO approached several projects for clients, including the design of Walgreens’ new pharmacy department, which brings the pharmacist out from behind the pharmacy counter to interact with patients.

10 • August 12, 2013 DrugStoreNewS.com

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What Are The Top 10 Characteristics of Leading ‘Dark Horse’ Companies? http://mackelevationforum.com/what-are-the-top-10-characteristics-of-leading-dark-horse-companies/ http://mackelevationforum.com/what-are-the-top-10-characteristics-of-leading-dark-horse-companies/#comments Thu, 23 Apr 2015 18:17:41 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=1144 The post What Are The Top 10 Characteristics of Leading ‘Dark Horse’ Companies? appeared first on Mack Elevation Forum.

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By Dan Mack,  Drugstore News

Everyone loves a dark horse — the come-from-behind winner that no one expects. We cheer for them, marvel at their tenacity and hope for their victory over
stronger, better-known competitors.
But why do dark horses win? They aren’t favored to win, and often for good reason. They usually don’t have big money invested in them; they have no history of winning, and not many people have heard of them. The usual formula for winning the race just isn’t there.
What are the winning characteristics of dark horse companies that sneak up on everybody? Here is a hint: “They re-set the rules of engagement and often times change the economics of a category.”
Yet they win. And it’s not a fluke.
Bigger, better-known competitors often don’t pay any or enough attention to dark horses until it’s too late and the dark horses streak past. Surprise is indeed the reaction of spectators — competitors, their investors, and the marketplace at large — when dark horses win.
I have personally evaluated, interviewed, or consulted with well over a hundred emerging companies that, by all accounts, were outmatched by competition — yet they were winning. Not only that, these dark horse companies seemed to be having more fun during the trip towards the finish line than the larger companies they competed against!
Winning organizations know that business is not transactional: It’s personal. They set their own rules of engagement, and their corporate values are shared by everyone across the organization. Expectations are clear; employees are encouraged to find and use new resources. Fear of failure is discouraged, and power is shared.
Sound too utopian?
We have also found that some of the best companies are also somewhat messy at times. Even though they have clearly defined the sandbox they play in, they are always evaluating, innovating, and tinkering around the edges of their business. Nothing is perfect — and they like it that way.
Speed-to-market is another characteristic of successful dark horses. As one customer shared with me, “the best companies move from prototype to end product quicker than competitors, and have learned to deal with the messiness.” Winning companies are constantly in the process of re-invigorating their business, leaving competitors in their wake. They ask a lot of questions and never assume they are done understanding the industry or their business.
Co-creating your next line of product innovations with your best customer(s) is a powerful idea that fuels growth. Risky? Sure, but as one executive told me, “you can’t afford the risk of not co-creating products with your top customers.”
Some of the most successful companies that co-create with customers have found that professionally facilitated discovery meetings can help unlock an innovation stalemate and create competitive advantage. Winners walk out of those meetings with customized, exclusive products for their top customers.
Dark horse organizations are good at flying under the radar. This can give them an advantage in sneaking up on the competition, but can also result in them being marginalized or flat-out ignored. However, the stronger its sense of purpose, the more likely a dark horse organization will leave its imprint on the business landscape. They can even go so far as to become the catalysts for dramatic innovation and sometimes even larger societal or cultural shifts. Think Steve Jobs and the Apple revolution.
The leaders of dark horse companies, and the companies themselves, share a number of characteristics:
1. Their business is personal; their identity and purpose are about more than profit.
2. They listen well and diagnose, staying in alignment with top customers.
3. They use their organization’s hidden assets to create differentiating value.
4. They create a clear, vibrant business blueprint and share it openly with employees.
5. They carefully and wisely pick their customers and their partners.
6. They co-create innovation with customers.
7. They move quickly to meet consumer shifts to create new experiences.
8. They influence the influencers who help build their brand.
9. Everybody in the company takes a role selling and marketing the brand.
10. Corporate culture operates with a spirit of honor, unleashing the skills of the team.
It is difficult to know if a dark horse will overtake you, but we do know that dark horse competitors do leave clues. Take the time to reflect on and to question your own corporate culture, your leadership style, and your strategies for engaging customers and your overall sales strategy. Think about the ideas outlined in this article, let them marinate, and then act decisively.
A Lebhar-Friedman® Publication

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Get the Boss to Buy In http://mackelevationforum.com/get-the-boss-to-buy-in/ http://mackelevationforum.com/get-the-boss-to-buy-in/#comments Tue, 14 Apr 2015 07:04:58 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=848 The Idea: No doubt, there is risk in selling upward in an organization. But there is more risk in not selling your vision. Issue selling is an ongoing process that requires setting the table, diligence, and strategic yet patient communication. It is the only way to make a difference. And the best leaders practice this skill in their daily operations.

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From: hbr.org
Date: January 2015
Direct Link
https://hbr.org/2015/01/get-the-boss-to-buy-in utm_campaign=Socialflow&utm_source=Socialflow&utm_medium=Tweet

The Idea: No doubt, there is risk in selling upward in an organization.  But there is more risk in not selling your vision.  Issue selling is an ongoing process that requires setting the table, diligence, and strategic yet patient communication. It is the only way to make a difference.  And the best leaders practice this skill in their daily operations. 

Excerpt: An engineering manager at an energy company—we’ll call him John Healy—wanted to sell his boss on a safer and cheaper gas-scrubbing technology. This might have been an easy task if his boss, the general manager, hadn’t selected the existing system just a year before. Instead it was, in Healy’s words, “a delicate process.” Fortunately, user reviews of the new technology had become available only in the past several months, which Healy tactfully mentioned in his presentation  (continue reading on hbr.org)

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Do You Have an Excessive Need to Be Yourself? http://mackelevationforum.com/do-you-have-an-excessive-need-to-be-yourself/ http://mackelevationforum.com/do-you-have-an-excessive-need-to-be-yourself/#comments Tue, 14 Apr 2015 07:02:31 +0000 http://mackelevationforum.com/?p=852 The Idea: Marshall Goldsmith is one of the top executive coaches in the world, and his book “What Got You Here, Won’t Get you There” is a classic. This brief article conveys one simple truth; less me + more them = more success as a leader. Check it out.

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From: hbr.org
Date: July 2009
Direct Link: https://hbr.org/2009/07/do-you-have-an-excessive-need/

The Idea: Marshall Goldsmith is one of the top executive coaches in the world, and his book “What Got You Here, Won’t Get you There” is a classic.  This brief article conveys one simple truth; less me + more them = more success as a leader. Check it out. 

Excerpt: One of the 20 annoying habits discussed in my book, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There, is “an excessive need to be me.” What do we mean by “an excessive need to be me?”

Each of us has a pile of behaviors that we define as “me.” These are the behaviors, both positive and negative, that we think of as our unalterable essence. While many of these “me” behaviors may be positive  (continue reading on hbr.org)

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